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Posts Tagged ‘Advanced Configuration’

VMware: Repeated characters when typing in remote console

April 7th, 2015 1 comment

Everyone knows the hanging keyboard console session issue, when you type your username or password the keyboard hangs. If you access a virtual machine console over a slow connection, you’ll encounter keyboard sync issues

If you open a remote console to a virtual machine from a slow network connection (such as a VPN) while tethered to a mobile phone providing Internet access, the experience is not optimal, as keyboard and mouse gestures aren’t timed exactly the same. This is especially problematic if you try to enter a password where the characters are masked.

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Solution

There are two ways to add a extra line in the configuration file of the virtual machine,

 

Option 1. Edit VMX file directly

1. Power off the virtual machine.

2. Add a line, similar to this, at the end of your virtual machine’s configuration (.vmx) file

keyboard.typematicMinDelay = "2000000"

The delay is specified in micro-seconds, so the line in the example above increases the repeat time to 2 seconds. This should ensure that you never get auto-repeat unless you intend it.

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3. Power on the virtual machine.

 

Option 2. Edit VMX via vSphere Client

1. Power off the virtual machine.

2. Edit settings > Options > General > Configuration Parameters, add new row with text:

keyboard.typematicMinDelay = "2000000"

The delay is specified in micro-seconds, so the line in the example above increases the repeat time to 2 seconds. This should ensure that you never get auto-repeat unless you intend it.

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3. Power on the virtual machine.

 

Ps. You can edit the .VMX files directly, but a better practice is to configure this value within the vSphere Client for a virtual machine template. When you consider that most of the access to a virtual machine is provided by tools such as remote desktop, there is no harm in configuring this value globally for all virtual machines that originate from a template

sanderdaems

Sander Daems is founder and author of this blog and working as a Sr. Infrastructure Consultant by IT-Value. Sander has over 10 years experience in IT, primary focus: virtualization, storage and SBC

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VMware: My favorite Windows 2012R2 template configuration

December 16th, 2014 9 comments

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Virtual Hardware (VMX) Template configuration

Hardware Value
Memory 2 GB
CPU’s Number of virtual sockets: 1
Number of cores per socket: 2
Video card Number of video displays: 1
Total video memory: 5 MB (1280×1024)
VMCI device None
SCSI Controller 0
Hard disk 1
LSI Logic SAS, bus sharing: none
40 GB, Thick Provision Eager Zeroed (<—best performance)
CD/DVD Drive 1 Client Device
Floppy Drive 1 Removed
Network Adapter 1 VMXNET3, network: VM Network with DHCP (for joining domain)
General Options OS: Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 (64-bit)
VMware Tools Advanced: Check and upgrade Tools during power cycling
Virtual Machine Version 8 (not 9 because you only can edit version 9 via vSphere web-client)
Advanced > General Enable logging

 

Virtual Machine BIOS configuration

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Configuration Value
Boot-time Diagnostics Screen Enabled

Read more…

sanderdaems

Sander Daems is founder and author of this blog and working as a Sr. Infrastructure Consultant by IT-Value. Sander has over 10 years experience in IT, primary focus: virtualization, storage and SBC

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VMware: The number of heartbeat datastores for host is 0

May 7th, 2013 2 comments

Today I added some vSphere 5.0 u1 hosts in a new created cluster, the SAN will be delivered next week so I didn’t have central storage, to finish my new cluster setup I configured HA and DRS. After configuring HA I received this warning message:

 

The number of heartbeat datastores for host is 0, which is less than required: 2

VMpros

 

Solution:

To (temporary (until the SAN is installed)) hide the warning message I configured the HA – Advanced Option:

  1. Log in to vCenter Server
  2. Right-click the cluster and click Edit Settings
  3. Click VMware HA > Advanced Options
  4. Under Option, add an entry for das.ignoreInsufficientHbDatastore
  5. Under Value, type: true

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More information: VMware

sanderdaems

Sander Daems is founder and author of this blog and working as a Sr. Infrastructure Consultant by IT-Value. Sander has over 10 years experience in IT, primary focus: virtualization, storage and SBC

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VMware: Enable/Disable TechSupportMode in ESXi 4.0

December 2nd, 2010 3 comments

You can disable or re-enable Tech Support Mode on a ESXi 3.* or 4.0 host by modifying Advanced Configuration parameters.

In ESXi 4.1 you can change the startup services to automatic/manual/disabled or manual start/stop the service.

On the ESXi 4.0 host you need to login with your VI Client direcly or via vCenter server and select your ESXi host.

  1. Click the Configuration tab;

  2. Click the Advanced Settings link;

  3. Click VMkernel in the left-hand pane;

  4. In the list of parameters, deselect VMkernel.Boot.techSupportMode;

VMpros.nl

Note: Reboot the host before the setting takes effect!

sanderdaems

Sander Daems is founder and author of this blog and working as a Sr. Infrastructure Consultant by IT-Value. Sander has over 10 years experience in IT, primary focus: virtualization, storage and SBC

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
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